Multifocal Versus Single Vision Lenses Intervention to Slow Progression of Myopia in School-age Children: A Meta-analysis

      Abstract

      Myopia in school-aged children is a major public health problem in Asians that has been extensively studied. Multifocal lenses (MLs) are advocated as a substitute for single vision lenses (SVLs) to slow myopia progression in children, but results vary greatly across studies. We systematically searched currently available randomized controlled trials that compared the effects of MLs and SVLs in children. A meta-analysis of nine of these trials showed that MLs with powers ranging from +1.50 to +2.00D were associated with a statistically significantly decrease in myopia progression in school-aged children compared with SVLs. The benefit was greater in children with a higher level of myopia at baseline and sustained for a minimum of 24 months. Asian children appeared to have greater benefit from intervention with MLs than white children.

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